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Hingley’s Cost and Weight summary for the Central<empty> Anchor for the Titanic. The top line identifies Rogerson as the supplier of ‘Anchor Head & Blocks’. Reproduced by permission of Dudley Archives & Local History Service from N. Hingley & Sons Business Records, WRI/1/6/4/12

Hingley’s Cost and Weight summary for the Central Anchor for the Titanic. The top line identifies Rogerson as the supplier of ‘Anchor Head & Blocks’. Reproduced by permission of Dudley Archives & Local History Service from N. Hingley & Sons Business Records, WRI/1/6/4/12

History

Modern
The North Pennines is also a European and Global Geopark and many other minerals have been mined and quarried here including silver, zinc, fluorspar, limestone and ironstone.

During the majority of the twentieth century this was still an industrial region. The steelworks at Wolsingham typify the fortunes of the area, opened by Charles Atwood in 1864, the firm under John Rogerson made the anchor head for the Titanic in 1911. The firm worked flat out on munitions during both World Wars but thereafter was affected by the cycle of rationalisation, nationalisation and privatisation that characterised the decline of UK heavy engineering and the company finally closed at the beginning of the recession in 2008.

Another aspect of global conflict was the establishment of prison camps in the remote North Pennines. Camp 18 at Featherstone Park was one of the largest POW camps in Britain, at one time housing 4000 German officers and 600 orderlies. The Easter 1947 Die Zeit am Tyne, the camp newspaper printed in Hexham led with an article on the subject of a united Europe, an issue that has not gone away.

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